People Report The Most Stress about This Climate Worry
Alexis Blue, 20 Jan 18
       

(Credit: sodaniechea/Flickr)

While some people have little anxiety about the Earth’s changing climate, others are experiencing high levels of stress, and even depression, based on their perception of the threat of global climate change, according to new research.


People who worry about animals and nature tend to have a more planetary outlook and think of bigger picture issues…


Significant research has explored the environmental impacts of climate change, but far fewer studies have considered its psychological effect on humans, says researcher Sabrina Helm, an associate professor of family and consumer science in the University of Arizona’s Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

Helm and her colleagues found that psychological responses to climate change seem to vary based on what type of concern people show for the environment, with those highly concerned about the planet’s animals and plants experiencing the most stress.

In Global Environmental Change, the researchers outline three distinct types of environmental concern:

1. Egoistic concern is concern about how what’s happening in the environment directly affects the individual; for example, a person might worry about how air pollution will affect their own lungs and breathing.

2. Altruistic concern refers to concern for humanity in general, including future generations.

3. Biospheric concern refers to concern for nature, plants, and animals.

In an online survey of 342 parents of young children, those who reported high levels of biospheric concern also reported feeling the most stressed about global climate change, while those whose concerns were more egoistic or altruistic did not report significant stress related to the phenomenon.

In addition, those with high levels of biospheric concern were most likely to report signs of depression, while no link to depression was found for the other two groups.

“People who worry about animals and nature tend to have a more planetary outlook and think of bigger picture issues,” Helm says.

“For them, the global phenomenon of climate change very clearly affects these bigger picture environmental things, so they have the most pronounced worry, because they already see it everywhere,” Helm explains. “We already talk about extinction of species and know it’s happening. For people who are predominantly altruistically concerned or egoistically concerned about their own health, or maybe their own financial future, climate change does not hit home yet.”

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