Why Children Should Be Taught To Build A Positive Online Presence
Rachel Buchanan, 12 Jan 18
       

While digital footprints are considered to be a liability, if managed well they can be an asset. Shutterstock

Rather than just teaching children about internet safety and reducing their digital footprint, we should also encourage them to curate a positive digital footprint which will be an asset for them in their future.

Today’s children are prolific users of the internet. Concern has been raised about the future impact of the digital footprints they are generating. While much discussion of this issue focuses on keeping children safe, little is known about how children manage their digital footprints.

While digital footprints are considered to be a liability, if managed well they can be an asset. Digital footprints can showcase identity, skills and interests. This is important in an era where employers “google” candidates to check their identity and verify their suitability. In this context, having no digital footprint can be as much of a disadvantage as having a poorly managed one.

The “Best Footprint Forward” project explored what children know about digital footprints. Focus groups were made up of 33 children aged 10-12 years from three schools in regional NSW. Analysis of the focus groups reveals children have strategies to keep safe online, but they need further guidance on how to build a positive digital footprint.

What children know and do about digital footprints

The project found, while children use the internet for a variety of purposes (such as homework, gaming, watching videos), communicating with friends was the most popular online activity.

Most children in the focus group used Instagram just to talk to each other. Shutterstock

The children knew what digital footprints were:

·       what you put online stays online

·       people could find you if you left identifying information, such as your address or full name

·       employers would check your social media.

They talked about password security, not putting personal details online (such as their name, address and date of birth), blocking people who harassed them, getting advice from parents, not clicking on anything silly, not posting pictures of their faces. They showed awareness of the potential consequences of their actions.

The implications of their digital footprint awareness led them to try to minimise theirs, to try to be invisible online. They mainly communicated with one another via Instagram, using it as a messaging service. All but one child had their account set to private, and very few posted photos. They used it just to talk.

While the children in the study had a high level of digital footprint awareness, they are only aware of this as a liability. Their responses did not include any discussion of the benefits offered by digital footprints. Their re-purposing of Instagram as a messaging service suggests a savvy and pragmatic approach to the problem of, in the words of one girl in the study, the “internet always keeping it”. Educative interventions should be designed to empower and protect children, to supplement their existing digital footprint management strategies.

Sign in to view full article

       
The Future: Making Singapore an Elder-Friendly Place
The government aims to make Singapore “an inclusive elder-friendly place” and the first step starts from the elders’ flats.
Jocelyn Neo
Mon, 2 Jan 17
Is The Developed World We’ve Created Giving Us Cancer?
I had assumed that the small lump in my breast was a blocked milk duct from nursing my seven-month-old son. ...
Chelsey Kivland
Thu, 8 Jun 17
Norway’s Oil Fund Is A Tarnished Gold Standard For Sustainable Investment
The largest sovereign wealth fund in the world, Norway’s US$930 billion Government Pension Fund Global, is seen as the epitome ...
Beate Sjåfjell
Thu, 4 May 17
Are The Rich More Selfish Than The Rest Of Us?
Social scientists have long known that the rich are not exactly model citizens.
Jan Stoop, James Andreoni, Nikos Nikiforakis
Wed, 12 Apr 17
Does Playing Chess Make You Smarter? A Look at The Evidence
The stereotype of the chess player is someone who is smart, logical and good at maths. This is why so ...
Giovanni Sala, Fernand Gobet
Wed, 17 May 17
An Epoch Times Survey
An Epoch Times Survey
At Epoch Times, We Care :o)
BUCHERER
Sports Elements
Sports Elements