Why Children Should Be Taught To Build A Positive Online Presence
Rachel Buchanan, 12 Jan 18
       

While digital footprints are considered to be a liability, if managed well they can be an asset. Shutterstock

Rather than just teaching children about internet safety and reducing their digital footprint, we should also encourage them to curate a positive digital footprint which will be an asset for them in their future.

Today’s children are prolific users of the internet. Concern has been raised about the future impact of the digital footprints they are generating. While much discussion of this issue focuses on keeping children safe, little is known about how children manage their digital footprints.

While digital footprints are considered to be a liability, if managed well they can be an asset. Digital footprints can showcase identity, skills and interests. This is important in an era where employers “google” candidates to check their identity and verify their suitability. In this context, having no digital footprint can be as much of a disadvantage as having a poorly managed one.

The “Best Footprint Forward” project explored what children know about digital footprints. Focus groups were made up of 33 children aged 10-12 years from three schools in regional NSW. Analysis of the focus groups reveals children have strategies to keep safe online, but they need further guidance on how to build a positive digital footprint.

What children know and do about digital footprints

The project found, while children use the internet for a variety of purposes (such as homework, gaming, watching videos), communicating with friends was the most popular online activity.

Most children in the focus group used Instagram just to talk to each other. Shutterstock

The children knew what digital footprints were:

·       what you put online stays online

·       people could find you if you left identifying information, such as your address or full name

·       employers would check your social media.

They talked about password security, not putting personal details online (such as their name, address and date of birth), blocking people who harassed them, getting advice from parents, not clicking on anything silly, not posting pictures of their faces. They showed awareness of the potential consequences of their actions.

The implications of their digital footprint awareness led them to try to minimise theirs, to try to be invisible online. They mainly communicated with one another via Instagram, using it as a messaging service. All but one child had their account set to private, and very few posted photos. They used it just to talk.

While the children in the study had a high level of digital footprint awareness, they are only aware of this as a liability. Their responses did not include any discussion of the benefits offered by digital footprints. Their re-purposing of Instagram as a messaging service suggests a savvy and pragmatic approach to the problem of, in the words of one girl in the study, the “internet always keeping it”. Educative interventions should be designed to empower and protect children, to supplement their existing digital footprint management strategies.

Sign in to view full article

       
Holocaust of the 21st Century
In all other countries, recipients wait for organs. But in China, organs wait for recipients. This is only possible if ...
Richard A. Lyons
Mon, 2 Jan 17
From ‘White Flight’ to ‘Bright Flight’ – The Looming Risk for Our Growing Cities
If the growth of cities in the 20th century was marked by “white flight”, the 21st century is shaping up ...
Jason Twill
Fri, 19 May 17
Our Experiments Taught Us Why People Troll
“Fail at life. Go bomb yourself.”
Justin Cheng, Michael Bernstein, Cristian Danescu-Niculescu-Mizil
Mon, 6 Mar 17
Young Workers Expect Their Older Colleagues to Get Out of The Way
There are many names for the narratives pitting the older generation against the younger: Gen-Y versus Baby Boomers, “Generation Me” ...
Michael North
Wed, 15 Mar 17
Organ Harvesting in China: Foreigners ‘Are 1 in 5’ Transplant Recipients
Prisoners of conscience are murdered on demand for their organs in China to supply a state-run transplant industry where one ...
James Burke
Mon, 20 Feb 17
An Epoch Times Survey
An Epoch Times Survey
An Epoch Times Survey
Read about Forced Organ Harvesting
Sports Elements
Sports Elements