Telemedicine And School Nurse Combo Cut Asthma ER Visits
Sean Dobbin, 10 Jan 18
       

(Credit: Getty Images)

Kids with asthma who participated in a program that involved a combination of telemedicine support and school-based medication therapy were almost half as likely to require an emergency room or hospital visit due to their asthma, according to new research.

One in 10 children in the United States have asthma, making it the country’s most common chronic childhood disease. Though symptoms can be effectively managed through regular use of preventive medicine, children must first be diagnosed, and then must regularly take their medication—minority children living in poverty, in particular, do not always receive these interventions.

As a result, these children suffer many preventable and potentially dangerous asthma flare-ups, which can lead to expensive emergency room visits.

The new study expands on previous research that showed children with asthma who took their preventive medication at school under the supervision of their school nurse were less likely to have asthma issues. The addition of the telemedicine component—which allows for the child’s primary care provider to stay readily involved in the child’s care—makes the program more sustainable and scalable, potentially allowing it to be used as a model for urban-based asthma care nationally.

“Clinicians and researchers across the country are designing similar programs, using resources available in their communities to reach underserved children with asthma and help them get needed assessments,” says Jill Halterman, chief of the division of general pediatrics at the University of Rochester Medical Center and the study’s lead author.

“But regardless of how you’re reaching them initially, those children may continue to have issues if they aren’t taking their medications regularly. The integration of telemedicine with supervised treatment through school provides one model to ensure that children receive consistent, effective asthma treatment,” Halterman says.

The study enrolled 400 students between the ages of 3 and 10 in the Rochester City School District.

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