Explainer: The Gods Behind The Days Of The Week
Margaret Clunies Ross, 3 Jan 18

The Roman weekday ‘dies Veneris’ was named after the planet Venus, which in turn took its name from Venus, goddess of love. Detail from Venus and Mars, Botticelli, tempera on panel (c1483). Wikimedia Commons

The origins of our days of the week lie with the Romans. The Romans named their days of the week after the planets, which in turn were named after the Roman gods:

• dies Solis “the day of the sun (then considered a planet)”
• dies Lunae “the day of the moon”
• dies Martis, “the day of Mars”
• dies Mercurii, “the day of Mercury”
• dies Iovis, “the day of Jupiter”
• dies Veneris, “the day of Venus”
• dies Saturni, “the day of Saturn”

Sign in to view full article

How Hot-Deskers are Made to Feel Like the Homeless People of the Office World
If you work in an open-plan, hot-desking environment, you have probably at some point found yourself trudging through the office, ...
Alison Hirst
Thu, 16 Feb 17
Every Picture Tells A Story, But Visualisation Can Tell The Right One
They say a picture is worth a thousand words.
Quang Vinh Nguyen
Thu, 4 May 17
How To Calculate The Economic Impact Of Grief
The death of a child is one of the most traumatic experiences that a parent can experience. Those who do ...
Gerard Van den Berg
Sat, 14 Jan 17
My Smartphone, Myself: Digital Separation Anxiety in The Postmodern World
Has this ever happened to you: you accidentally leave your cell phone at home, and it feels like your soul ...
Abraham Martínez González
Wed, 18 Jan 17
Singapore’s Ageing Population, a Challenge for Hospitals and Nurses
The increase in hospital admission and ensuing demands on intensive medical care will trigger the need for more hospital beds: ...
Epoch Newsroom
Mon, 2 Jan 17
An Epoch Times Survey
An Epoch Times Survey
AcuSLIM - Acupuncture Weight Loss Programme
Read about Forced Organ Harvesting
Sports Elements
Sports Elements